SEAFOOD RECIPES (35)

 

Seafood of all types is eaten through out Malaysia. There are types of seafood that would not usually be on the menu here but my recipes are more 'main stream.'

Tom Yum Soup : Although this is really a Thai dish it features highly on any list of Malaysian dishes cooked in the home. It is strongly flavoured and makes a delicious lunch.

Prawn Soup : Packed with flavour, this soup uses rice vermicelli noodles and a combination of prawn, egg, lettuce and sambal to give a complex set of tastes. It takes a little longer to prepare than some dishes but it is really worth the effort.

Otak Otak : An unusual dish using fish as the base. It is first processed into a paste with spices and coconut and then wrapped before being cooked by grilling. It is a very different way to eat fish.

Fried Fish : Fish is an important part of everyone's diet in Malaysia and one of the most common ways to cook it is to fry it in a wok. The type of fish isn't overly important as long as it is small enough to fit into a wok (or kuali).

Spiced Fish : If you want a dish that packs a bit of a punch then spiced whole fried fish is the dish for you. Tamarind gives this dish a sharpness of flavour and chilli gives it bite.

Pickled Fish : Malaysian picked fish is a lot different to the western style of vinegar and a few spices. This is a dish you can use straight away or put away in the fridge for later on.

Oyster Sambal : Although this dish uses oysters, you can substitute mussels, pipis or cockles if you have them available.

Chilli Prawns (Indian style) : As Thailand shares a border with Malaysia, the two countries influence each others cuisine. This is an example of how Thai dishes have migrated south to Malaysia.

Spicy Prawns : This recipe also works well with fish and chicken . An alternate recipe for fish uses the following: Marinate fish in 1 tsp Thai soya sauce 1/8 tsp salt, 1/8 tsp sugar, 1/8 tsp corn flour.

Marinated Raw Fish : Raw fish isn?t for everyone but if you have never tried it why not give it a go. This dish is made with garfish.

Har Loke (Spicy Prawn) : In Australia we are lucky enough to have access to some of the best seafood money can buy. With the price of meat being so high these days prawns have become a much more attractive alternative.

Octopus Sambal : Squid is more commonly eaten than octopus in Australia but they are quite similar in their eating properties. Octopus is not as sweet but if cooked correctly is a good alternative.

Baked Perch : There are all sorts of perch that you can catch around Australia. We normally use mangrove Jack, Spanish Flag and Moses Perch. Other types of fish are also suitable for this dish including emperor.

Basic Sambal : Although this is not a fish dish in itself, the sambal mixture can be used with all sorts of seafood.

Fish Balls : Fish balls are a common ingredient in Malaysian soup dishes. They are rarely used as a meat dish on their own but are added to soups like Pork Noodle Soup.

Fried Whole Cod : Malaysian generally do not fillet the fish they cook, most is just cleaned and scaled then cooked whole. This is an example of a typical Malaysian fish dish.

Savoury Fish Cakes : Malaysians generally do not fillet the fish they cook, most is just cleaned and scaled then cooked whole. This is an example of a typical Malaysian fish dish.

Deep Fried Fish Tofu : This dish will take a while to prepare but once you taste the results you will find the effort has been worth while. Rice flour adds a crispy coating to the fried tofu and if you want more bite simply add more chillies.

Squid and Scallop Sambal : This dish will take a while to prepare but once you taste the results you will find the effort has been worth while. Rice flour adds a crispy coating to the fried tofu and if you want more bite simply add more chillies.

Herring in Plum Sauce : Australian herring is not really a herring at all but is related to Australian Salmon - which is also not a salmon. Confused? Well it is caught widely and I developed this recipe for it.

Fish with Soya Bean Paste : Another recipe using Australian herring but this time with yellow soya bean paste and fresh chilli.

Lemon Grass & Prawn Sambal : A different style of sambal with prawns, squid, lemon grass and ginger. As with most sambal dishes it has hot chillies as in integral ingredient.

Butter Prawns : Simple, quick and delicious, what more do I need to say?

Prawn with Black Bean : Another simple prawn dish this time with black beans. It is important not to overdo black beans with any dish and many times restaurants add far too much.

Tuna Sambal : Ever been caught with no meat and only some canned tuna in the cupboard? Then this is the dish for you. Cheap, easy to prepare and very tasty!

Sweet & Sour Fish : A two step dish, that although it takes a lot of work, it worth the effort. It is similar to the pork version but is different enough to warrant an entry of its own.

Pineapple Prawn Curry : Spicy, a bit hot, sweet, sour, this dish has everything for a real flavour blast.

Curry Laksa : A soupy seafood and noodle dish that is just right for a hearty lunch or light dinner.

Tempe Sambal : This dish combines texture and taste and if you want a bit of heat too all you have to do is add a bit more chilli.

Tamarind Prawns : A dry fried dish of large banana prawns that combines the tang of tamarind with the bite of chilli.

Snow Peas with Seafood : Snow peas are a bit expensive but you don't need all that many to make a meal. They have a lovely flavour and mixed with prawn and squid they make a fine dish.

Thai Curry Laksa : This is a different dish to Curry Laksa above and is inspired by Thai flavours using lemon grass, Vietnamese mint and kaffir lime leaves.

Thai Fish Cakes : Easy to make, tasty and almost god for you, what more could you want?
Fried Fish and Plum Sauce : Whole fish deep fried and then topped with a plum sauce and chilli sauce.
Tuna Sang Yue : A raw fish dish that tastes great and only takes a few minutes to prepare.

 

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All the recipes on this disc/website are original and copyright (c) 2010 Dorothy P.C. Loader.

 

 

 

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